The standard tool for listing symbols is nm, you can use it simply like this:

nm -gD yourLib.so

If you want to see symbols of a C++ library, add the “-C” option which demangle the symbols (it’s far more readable demangled).

nm -gDC yourLib.so

If your .so file is in elf format, you have two options:

Either objdump (-C is also useful for demangling C++):

$ objdump -TC libz.so

libz.so:     file format elf64-x86-64

DYNAMIC SYMBOL TABLE:
0000000000002010 l    d  .init  0000000000000000              .init
0000000000000000      DF *UND*  0000000000000000  GLIBC_2.2.5 free
0000000000000000      DF *UND*  0000000000000000  GLIBC_2.2.5 __errno_location
0000000000000000  w   D  *UND*  0000000000000000              _ITM_deregisterTMCloneTable

Or use readelf:

$ readelf -Ws libz.so
Symbol table '.dynsym' contains 112 entries:
   Num:    Value          Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     0: 0000000000000000     0 NOTYPE  LOCAL  DEFAULT  UND
     1: 0000000000002010     0 SECTION LOCAL  DEFAULT   10
     2: 0000000000000000     0 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT  UND free@GLIBC_2.2.5 (14)
     3: 0000000000000000     0 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT  UND __errno_location@GLIBC_2.2.5 (14)
     4: 0000000000000000     0 NOTYPE  WEAK   DEFAULT  UND _ITM_deregisterTMCloneTable